Categories
wi-fi

Thats what I call a hotspot

Nice to see an airline really being cutting edge on technology. Together with Boeing, Lufthansa launches on-board WLAN service. With download speeds at 7 Mbit/s and upload starting at 128 Kbit/s (to be upgraded to 750 Kbit/s at a later date).

I am wired and net-addicted enough for this to affect my choice of airline on my next trip over the atlantic :-)

Categories
wi-fi

Setting up a Mobile Wireless Network

This is a cool story, about HighWLAN: A Driving Wireless Network. When Casey West and friends decided to drive from Pittsburgh to St. Louis they first thought about using cell-phones to communicate, but ended up (as true geeks) with the first known mobile Wi-Fi setup for communication. They threw in a cell-phone with an internet hookup, and voilà – they had a internet connected Wi-Fi network.

Very cool and geeky!

Categories
wi-fi

Wi-Fi in the park

Interesting article in the New York Times today: Escaping to Bryant Park, but Staying Connected to the Web

It was the perfect collision of technology and nature, at least the way Oren Eckhaus, a Brooklyn photographer, describes it. He was surfing the Internet on his Apple Titanium PowerBook one day last week and a leaf fluttered in a light breeze and landed on his keyboard.

“I’m surrounded by all this technology, and this leaf falls — that is so amazing,” Mr. Eckhaus said, sitting in the shade on a bench in Bryant Park last week. “Nothing like that can happen at home, except the coffee can spill on your computer.”

The really neat part about this project in Bryant Park, New York City, is that the access is made available for free. Currently there are more than 70 hotspots in NYC that are publicly accessible and free, all run by NYCwireless

Now if I could only convince some of the parks in Oslo to buy into this idea, and I would get a lot more fresh air and sunshine :-)

[Via Dave Winer]

Categories
flash wi-fi

Hobo Phil in search of bandwidth

thumbnail-s.gif

Phillip Torrone sent me an e-mail today telling me about his latest creation: Hobo Phil. Hobo Phil is your Pocket PC guide to reading Warchalking, and also helps you connect to the Wi-Fi networks you might find on your way.

Seems like a useful application for everyone with a Wi-Fi equipped Pocket PC

Categories
weblogs wi-fi

New tech-word: Warchalking

warchalk.gif

The picture above is an example of how warchalking might look like. Maybe not something that you understand instantly, but if you go over to Everything Burns and look at the proposal there, you might get a better idea of what it means.

Warchalking is the hobo-language for free wireless networking, in short – a way for people to mark where good wireless networking is available.

Sifry explains:

Starting in London, people are marking WiFi spots in chalk on the street, called Warchalking. Just like the hobos of old, these WiBos(Wi-Fi Hobos) are marking places friendly to them. They are using take-offs of the hobo sign system to mark places where bandwidth is available

[Via Sifry’s Alerts]

Categories
wi-fi

A Big Mac and some Wi-Fi?

That’ll be US $12.50 a month. The Register writes about McDonald’s and Softbank that are set to deliver 4000 hotspots in McDonald’s resturants in Japan.

McDonald’s serves WLAN broadband in Japan

Now, thats an idea to take global..

Categories
wi-fi

Sifry’s wi-fi alerts

David Sifry who runs the very interesting wi-fi company Sputnik that delivers community gateways, and enterprise solutions for 802.11 has his own weblog Sifry’s Alerts – continuously updated with links to news about Wi-fi.

Categories
wi-fi

Wi-Fi/Wlan blog

If you are interested in Wi-Fi / Wlan, bluetooth and wireless technology in general, then Glenn Fleishman’s blog 802.11b Networking News is something for you. I am sure it will be a blog I will continue to visit almost every day.

Categories
wi-fi

Packet-relay Radio – Future of wireless networks?

David Isenberg’s latest Smart Letter .. is interesting commentary on a number of issues, including a mini-essay on packet-relay networks, which potentially offer scalability to wi-fi:

Wireless packet-relay networks solve the problem of multiple, powerful, overlapping transmitters. A network of weak transmitters (with routers attached) can send a packet a long way without unnecessarily trampling on the spectral commons. Multiple hops replace additional amplification.

Packet-relay radio networks have some other nice properties, too. They solve the line-of-sight problem that restricts single-hop 802.11b transmissions. Multiple hops can get around a large building or over a hill. In addition, packet relay does not have the problems of large, capital-intensive buildouts, because customers own most of the infrastructure. When you want to connect to a packet-relay network, you go down to Radios-R-Us, bring home a unit, and plug it in. When you connect, you beef up the network infrastructure

Categories
wi-fi

Without a thread!

Yeah baby! Finally I am up and running without a thread. Wireless that is. Have been fighting with bad documentation and troublesome hardware – but now I am finally totally wireless with my Fujitsu-Siemens B2547 laptop (with touch screen :-) and an Ericsson T39M Bluetooth mobile phone (with triband and GPRS). Its nice to be able to work totally wirelessly, no wires between the laptop and the phone, and no IR connection to align and lose all the time. :-)

Yeah baby! This is groovy!